Analogy, Textuality, and Materiality in the Medieval Studies Classroom (extended remix): Presented at Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, 13 March, 2014

Here are the text and slides from a (successful!) job talk I gave at Georgia State. This is an expanded version of a previous roundtable presentation, and my goal was to demonstrate how my scholarship in medieval studies, rhetoric and composition, and the digital humanities informs my pedagogy and classrooom praxis. Thank you for the opportunity to come and speak with you today about my work as a teacher and scholar working in digital composition studies, medieval studies, and the digital humanities. Before I get into my talk, “Analogy, Textuality, and Materiality in the Medieval Studies Classroom,” I’d like to give you a brief overview of my background, to provide some context for the work I’ll be discussing. As a collaborator on the <emma>/Marca project, through my work with Hybrid Pedagogy, and as a Brittain postdoctoral fellow and then Assistant Director of Writing and Communication at Georgia Tech, I’ve developed and run workshops, bootcamps, orientation programs, and faculty professional development seminars focused on various permutations of “best practices for teaching with technology.” During the discussion period following my presentation, I am happy to talk about that experience and my approach to teaching in situations where the students are in fact my colleagues, or even my supervisors, and how I approach issues regarding resistance to technology in such settings. During my talk, however, I am going to keep the focus on my work with undergraduates in one of my own classes, a literature class. In doing so, I want to demonstrate how I might work with those of you who are interested in doing so, to use technology to adapt and scale...

Intellectual Property, Privacy, and Open Access Policy: Presented at the 4Cs, Indianapolis, IN, 19 March, 2014

This was my contribution to the workshop, “From Emma to Marca: Technology and Pedagogy in a Decade of Open Source Writing Software Development,” organized by Christy Desmet for the 2014 Conference on College Composition and Communication. I’ve revised the title a bit here to reflect more accurately the final contents of my brief talk.     My contribution continues our conversation about big picture issues of open source development, trying to answer the question, “What do we gain by bringing this sort of educational technology development in house, rather than outsourcing it to–mostly–corporate developers of proprietary software?” And my answer to that question is, “We acquire more control over our personal data and intellectual property.” To begin, I would like to consider the obvious questions involved in a decision whether to adopt a given technology in any class. As Ron and Sara demonstrated in their overview of the <emma>/Marca development process, when teachers and program administrators are involved in the development process, we aren’t just asking these questions, we also acquire a lot more control over the answers. This shift, from tech consumer to tech creator, mirrors to some extent the shift we are encouraging our students to make, from passive readers or content consumers to active readers and authors. And, like our students, when we began looking at the world from this new perspective, we realized that, in addition to the obvious questions everyone always asks, we also needed to begin thinking about a different set of questions that are equally relevant to our ethos as writers, teachers, and makers. In April of last year, the New York Times...
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