Open Access and the Digital Humanities: Open Access Week at Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA, 25 October, 2013

As part of Open Access Week 2013, I participated in a panel discussion on “Open Access and the Digital Humanities” with Ty Herrington and Ian Bogost at Georgia Tech. The panel was organized by Wendy Hagenmaier, Tech’s Digital Collections Archivist, and moderated by Brian Croxall and Stewart Varner from the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship. The conversation included discussion of what we mean by “open access,” whether the turn to open access publication may also require reconfiguring our understanding of the audience for and purposes of scholarly communication, how institutional policy might be crafted to distribute fairly the costs and benefits of open access publication requirements, and how the shift to open access models of intellectual property management might affect our work in the classroom. A video recording of the panel is archived and publicly available here. Descriptions and video of the panel and the other events Georgia Tech organized for Open Access Week 2013 are also available...

Re-Defining Hybridity for Higher Education: Emory Center for Interactive Teaching, Atlanta, GA, Spring 2013

In the Spring of 2013, Pete Rorabaugh and I conducted a four-part workshop series on hybrid learning and critical digital pedagogy for Emory’s Center for Interactive Teaching. Below is our overview of the series, linked to the working Google documents we created for the first three sessions. The final session was a “show-and-tell” where participating graduate teaching assistants and faculty shared their own work in the classroom. Overview The use of “hybrid” in educational circles requires some immediate unpacking. Like “postmodern” or “canonical,” it has accumulated several interpretations, some of which are contradictory. Hybrid education takes on an economic focus when it’s used to equate to seat time: half in the classroom, half in an electronic space. This application represents an administrative priority that, while not unfounded in our current economic climate, can be more useful for the university’s bottom line than for student learning. A reliance on economic hybridity results in a neoliberal environment where an educational commodity, the “curriculum,” is “delivered” to the most students possible at the lowest overhead cost to the institution. Within higher education circles, “hybrid” assumes several, often widely divergent interpretations. Significantly, in some administrative formulations, “hybrid” has often come to mean simply achieving a reduction in face-to-face time in the classroom through the integration of an online component. Left unexamined, this overly-simplistic formulation of “hybrid,” although it may serve the university’s economic interest by reducing instruction costs in the immediate term, may only incidentally serve–and may in some circumstances actively impede the achievement of–pedagogical goals like improving student learning outcomes. Critical pedagogy–a discipline evolved from the work of Paulo Freire and rooted...
css.php