Reflection and Reblogging from Day of DH (April 8, 2013)

Yesterday, I participated in the Day of Digital Humanities¬†for the first time. In previous years, for one reason or another, I’ve been sitting on the sidelines as my collaborators and colleagues blogged, tweeted, and photographed their work as digital humanists. In some cases, I think I may have even been incidentally featured (or perhaps implicated) in some of the blogs, tweets, and photos of said collaborators and colleagues. This time around, though, I took an active part in the day’s activities for two reasons primarily: I had time, and as an independent scholar, I wanted to take advantage of an opportunity to document my work within and engage with a disciplinary community. My contributions to the conversation were neither attention-grabbing nor particularly profound, but as I tweeted, blogged, and photographed–and perused the artifacts and project descriptions collected in the activity stream–I could glimpse how the work I am doing connects me with a field of scholars. And that connection is something that remains vital to my sense of professional identity, yet has become increasingly elusive since I’ve stepped outside the academy. For the moment, in spite of the ongoing debate about who is in and who is out, I think DH can still be characterized as an inclusive scholarly community (or at least one that is going to great lengths to be inclusive) precisely because it sponsors events like Day of DH, THATCamp, and DHSI where the diversity of our occupations, employment conditions, and opinions can be laid bare. Within such a motley collection, the idiosyncrasy of my particular position appears to my own eyes as less anomalous. I...
css.php