Making Law and Policy for Public Pedagogy: Emory Symposium on Digital Publication, Undergraduate Research, and Writing, Atlanta, GA, 29 February 2013

I’ve blogged here the Prezi and the notes from a presentation I made at the Emory Symposium on Digital Publication, Undergraduate Research, and Writing. Thank you to ┬áThe Emory College Writing Program, Emory’s Office of Information Technology, and Emory University Libraries, for inviting me here today. In keeping with a general desire to avoid the standard “sage on the stage” format and to prompt discussion rather than boredom, I’m going to offer a brief position statement outlining a general approach for responding to and dealing with regulatory issues that may arise as colleges and universities go public with pedagogy. Then I’ll walk through two examples that help to elaborate how that approach might shape decisions in matters that involve FERPA and public relations. I have written about fair use and copyright in the pedagogical context elsewhere, in particular on Hybrid Pedagogy and TECHStyle. For that reason primarily, although I’m happy to answer questions about intellectual property law during the Q&A, I’m not making that part of my prepared remarks today. [new frame] In addition to thanking the symposium organizers, I also want to acknowledge Moya Bailey, Tyanna Herrington, and Audrey Watters. In one fashion or another, they and their work are represented in or have influenced my talk today. [new frame] The Approach Interpretation and application of the law within a higher-educational setting can and should take into account factors that distinguish institutions of higher learning from other–especially commercial–regulatory contexts. Why? Because we should presume laws–especially laws specifically targeted at educational institutions–are designed to facilitate, or at the very least not interfere with the important work of the classroom....
css.php